Support for Renal Dialysis (Creation and Maintenance of Vascular Access)

The Vascular Center at Mercy - Baltimore, MD

The Vascular Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland, is a comprehensive center specializing in circulatory system disorders. Our vascular surgeons offer a variety of advanced treatment options and provide patients necessary care and support for critical procedures including renal dialysis.

What is Support for Renal Dialysis?

Kidneys have a variety of functions in the body, but when kidney disease reduces functions to 15% or less, they can no longer do their jobs. Dialysis is a therapy that performs kidney functions when a kidney can no longer function on its own. Before dialysis can begin, the doctor needs access to the bloodstream to allow blood to travel to and from the dialysis machine. This is called vascular access.

NEXT: Types of Support for Renal Dialysis: ›
Types of Support for Renal Dialysis:

Vascular access for dialysis treatment can be placed in the arms, legs, neck or chest. The access requires surgery and can be:

  • Arteriovenous fistula - a permanent access that is placed under the skin, usually in the arm, directly connecting an artery and vein.
  • Arteriovenous graft - a permanent access that is placed under the skin, usually in the arm, but includes man-made tubing that connects the artery and vein.
  • Central venous catheter or internal port device - an interim vascular access step for immediately required dialysis treatment.
NEXT: Who should receive Support for Renal Dialysis? ›
Who should receive Support for Renal Dialysis?

Patients who have reached a point of minimal kidney function due to kidney disease or failure require dialysis treatment.  

Meet Our Doctors: Vascular Center
The Vascular Center at Mercy - Baltimore, MD
Kurtis Kim, M.D.

Dr. Kurtis Kim is Director of The Vascular Laboratory at The Vascular Center at Mercy and a highly skilled vascular surgeon in the Baltimore area. 

See all Vascular Specialists ›
Patient Story:
Cheryl - Mercy Patient
Cheryl

Cheryl wears compression socks while working to help with venous insufficiency, a buildup of pressure in her legs.

See All Stories Like This ›