Monoclonal Gammopathy Of Uncertain Significance (MGUS) Treated at Mercy

Medical Oncology at Mercy - Baltimore

Monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) can be found during a blood test for another medical condition. At Medical Oncology and Hematology at Mercy our hematologists (doctors who treat blood disorders) have expertise in treating diseases such as monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS).

About the Condition

Monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance, or MGUS, is a blood disease where the body makes an abnormal protein called monoclonal protein (or M protein) in the blood. Your M protein produced by plasma cells (white blood cells) are found in your bone marrow. Not every case of monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance develops into a progressive disease. 

If monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance progresses it is usually linked to another condition or worsens over time because of other conditions. If your MGUS progresses, the level of M protein will be monitored. 

NEXT: Symptoms & Diagnostic Process ›
Symptoms & Diagnostic Process

Monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance does not typically have symptoms or signs. MGUS is usually found accidently in blood work for another condition. Some people show signs of numbness.

Your hematologist at Mercy will perform a physical examination and take a history of your health and may request the following tests:

  • Blood test
  • Bone marrow test
  • Urine tests
  •  X-rays

Causes of Monoclonal Gammopathy of Unknown Significance (MGUS)?

Monoclonal gammopahty of unknown significance (MGUS) takes place when your plasma cells (found in your bone marrow) create too much M protein. An excessive amount of M protein harms healthy cells in your bone marrow and can harm other tissues. 

Other factors that may cause monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) are genetics and environmental situations, like contact with certain pesticides and radiation from an atomic bomb.

Risk Factors of Monoclonal Gammopathy of Unknown Significance (MGUS)

The chances for developing monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) increase with the following:

  • Being an African American
  • Being in the 70 and 80 year old age range
  • Having a body mass index greater then 30
  • Having a family history of MGUS
  • Being a female
NEXT: Treatment Options ›
Treatment Options

The hematologists at Medical Oncology and Hematology at Mercy will work with you to determine the best treatment option for your monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) diagnosis. If MGUS progresses, your hematologist may recommend that you have checkups every 6 to 12 months and take medication. 

In most MGUS cases, treatment is not required. However, in some cases, MGUS develops into cancer. 

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