Biliary Cancer Treated by Specialists in the Baltimore Region

The Institute for Digestive Health and Liver Disease at Mercy - Baltimore, MD

At The Center for Liver and Hepatobiliary Diseases at Mercy in Baltimore, Dr. Paul ThuluvathDr. Anurag Maheshwari and Dr. Hwan Yoo are dedicated to diagnosing and treating diseases of the biliary tract system. When patients are faced with biliary disease, including biliary cancer, they turn to the expertise of our doctors for the most advanced treatment options.

About the Condition

Biliary cancer is found in the organs of the biliary system. The primary types of biliary cancer are hepatocellular carcinoma, or liver cancer, and cholangiocarcinoma, or bile duct cancer. Pancreatic cancer and gallbladder cancer also can be considered forms of biliary cancer.

NEXT: Symptoms & Diagnostic Process ›
Symptoms & Diagnostic Process

Patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis, a chronic, progressive disease of the liver, are at risk for biliary cancer.

Symptoms of biliary cancer include:

  • Jaundice
  • Abdominal pain
  • Itching
  • Swelling of the legs

Patients are screened for biliary cancer with sophisticated techniques performed through an endoscope. “Spyglass”, which allows doctors unparalleled views of the system, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram, or ERCP, and endoscopic ultrasound are used to diagnose biliary cancer.

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Treatment Options

Biliary cancers are treated surgically or with stents that are placed during an endoscopy. A liver transplant may be recommended for certain patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis or bile duct cancer.

Meet Our Doctors: Institute for Digestive Health and Liver Disease
Dr. Hwan Yoo - Mercy Medical Center
Hwan Yoo, M.D.

Dr. Hwan Yoo, Board Certified in Gastroenterology and Internal Medicine, is an experienced liver specialist at The Institute for Digestive Health and Liver Disease at Mercy.

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Tiffany - Mercy Patient
Tiffany

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