Complex Gynecologic Radical and Ultra-radical Surgeries

Gynecologic Oncology at Mercy

Traditional open surgery is often used for complex gynecologic radical and ultra-radical surgical cases and may be the best treatment option for the situation of some patients with gynecologic cancer. These surgeries are performed the traditional (open) way via one long incision in the abdominal area. For some cases, this method allows the surgeon to get the best view of the suspected cancer so that the cancer can be safely removed.

The type, size, and stage of cancer can indicate the extent of surgery needed to remove the cancerous tumor and areas to which the cancer may have spread. Ultra-radical surgery is the removal of as much of the cancerous tumor as possible and includes leaving a clear margin, or radius around the tumor location in which no more cancerous cells are found. Radical surgery is an extensive and complex surgery to remove the cancerous tumor along with any affected lymph nodes.

For these complex cancer surgeries the doctor has the added advantage of directly seeing, holding and examining the organs and tumor. Dr. Neil Rosenshein is a much sought-after presenter on this topic and has trained numerous physicians on the intricacies of traditional invasive surgery. In addition, he has written a comprehensive book on traditional invasive surgery for ovarian, uterine and cervical cancer. 


What types of gynecologic cancer can be treated with Traditional Open Surgery?

Traditional open surgery can be used to treat any type of gynecologic cancer, though, in some instances, minimally invasive laparoscopic or robotic surgery may be a better treatment method. Traditional open surgery is more invasive, however, it remains one of the best surgery options for many women, especially if they are diagnosed with complex cases of ovarian, uterine, and cervical cancer

NEXT: What types of gynecologic oncology procedures can be performed with Traditional Open Surgery? ›
What types of gynecologic oncology procedures can be performed with Traditional Open Surgery?

Traditional open surgery is often used for complex gynecologic radical and ultra-radical surgical cases. The type, size, and stage of cancer can indicate the extent of surgery needed to remove the cancerous tumor and areas to which the cancer may have spread. This method allows the surgeon to get a full view of the suspected cancer so that the cancer can be removed. 

The surgeons at The Gynecologic Oncology Center provide expertise in traditional open surgery to treat gynecologic conditions and cancers. Our doctors offer the following gynecologic procedures in the traditional open method for appropriate cases:

  • Hysterectomy - simple (removal of uterus and cervix) and radical (removal of uterus and cervix plus removal of upper vagina)
  • Oophorectomy - removal of one or both ovaries
  • Salpingo-oophorectomy - removal of one or both ovaries and one or both fallopian tubes
  • Ovarian Cystectomy - removal of ovarian cysts
  • Lysis of Adhesions - surgery to remove scar tissue and restore normal function and reduce pain
  • Pelvic Mass Resection - surgery to remove a tumor, cyst or growth in the pelvic region
  • Myomectomy - surgery for uterine fibroids
  • Sacropolpopexy - surgery to correct pelvic organ prolapse (when a woman's pelvic organs slip downward and out of normal position)
  • Lymph Node Dissection - surgery to remove and examine the lymph nodes in the pelvis to either prevent the spread of cancer or to understand the extent of the disease
NEXT: When is Traditional Open Surgery the best treatment option? ›
When is Traditional Open Surgery the best treatment option?

The best candidates for traditional invasive surgery are women who have an advanced stage of cancer, a very large tumor or a tumor that has spread to multiple organs. Traditional invasive surgery also may be recommended for women who are significantly overweight or have had prior abdominal surgeries resulting in layers of scar tissue. 

For these complex cancer surgeries, an incision is made in the lower abdomen to provide adequate room to remove the tumor. With open surgery, the surgeon has the added advantage of directly seeing, holding and examining the organs and tumor.