Mercy's Dr. Audrey Liu Discusses How To Improve Your Sleep Including How To Deal With Sleep Apnea

May 28, 2012
Dr. Audrey Liu, Director, The Sleep Center at Mercy

Dr. Audrey Liu, Director, The Sleep Center at Mercy

The National Institutes of Health report that about 25 percent of Americans have sleep problems, one of which is sleep apnea, but there are some things you can do about it.

"I found that I was waking up maybe nine, 10, 11 times a night, and I couldn't get back to sleep," said Mary Ann Driscoll, who said a lack of sleep was taking its toll on her day-to-day life. "By the end of the day, you feel like a dishrag, and then there's not much left of you for family."

So Driscoll joined a sleep study in which doctors are able to tell patients how much they're sleeping and if they stop breathing.

"You come into a center and spend the night. We do a lot of monitor, including oxygen levels, EKGs, breathing and brain waves to look at sleep," said Dr. Audrey Liu, medical director of the Sleep Center at Mercy Medical Center.

Driscoll's study revealed that she had moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea. She was then put on a CPAP machine to help her breathe at night. She also lost 130 pounds.

According to Dr. Liu, if you think you're not sleeping well, it's best to see a doctor and get evaluated.

"For day-to-day functioning, poor sleep can cause impaired concentration, difficulty at work, difficulty driving, and one of the main things we know about sleep apnea is it can increase your risk for having a car accident," Dr. Liu said.

Driscoll no longer needs the machine.

"If you find yourself getting sleepy every day, you might ask your family to take a listen, and then find a sleep doctor, and you will be on your road to better sleep," she said.

 

 

 


Dan Collins - Senior Director of Media Relations at Mercy Medical Center

Dan Collins, Senior Director of Media Relations

Email: dcollins@mdmercy.com Office: 410-332-9714 Cell: 410-375-7342

About Mercy

Founded in 1874 in downtown Baltimore by the Sisters of Mercy, Mercy Medical Center is a 183-licensed bed acute care university-affiliated teaching hospital. Mercy has been recognized as a top Maryland hospital by U.S. News & World Report; a Top 100 hospital for Women’s Health & Orthopedics by Healthgrades; is currently A-rated for Hospital Safety (Leapfrog Group), and is recognized by the American Nurses Credentialing Center as a Magnet Hospital. Mercy Medical Center is part of Mercy Health Services (MHS), the parent of Mercy’s primary care and specialty care physician enterprise, known as Mercy Personal Physicians, which employs more than 200 providers with locations in Baltimore, Lutherville, Overlea, Glen Burnie, Columbia and Reisterstown. For more information about Mercy, visit www.mdmercy.com, MDMercyMedia on FacebookTwitter, or call 1-800-MD-Mercy.

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