Dr. Craig Vander Kolk Discusses Procedure For Correcting Lumpectomy Defects After Breast Reconstruction

June 10, 2014
Cosmetic Medicine and Surgery at Mercy - Baltimore

According to Dr. Craig Vander Kolk, Director of Cosmetic Medicine and Surgery at Mercy, a new fat-grafting procedure can change the appearance left after a lumpectomy.

Breast reconstruction after a lumpectomy is becoming more routine these days because breast conservation has become more sophisticated, according to doctors.

While a lumpectomy can preserve the breast, the breast may be left with some defects, such as a hollow spot, experts said.

According to Dr. Craig Vander Kolk, Director of Cosmetic Medicine and Surgery at Mercy, a new fat-grafting procedure can change the appearance left after a lumpectomy.

"After that, you also have radiation, which can change the breast. It becomes a little firmer; it changes the texture. By using fat grafting with stem cells, the tissues become healthy, and we use the fat to fill that defect that was created," Dr. Vander Kolk said.

The fat is often taken from the abdomen. From there, Dr. Vander Kolk explained that the surgeon can remove a little extra fat, creating a smaller waist and improving the patient's morale.

View Dr. Vander Kolk’s interview regarding correcting lumpectomy defects after breast reconstruction due to breast cancer.


Dan Collins - Senior Director of Media Relations at Mercy Medical Center

Dan Collins, Senior Director of Media Relations

Email: dcollins@mdmercy.com Office: 410-332-9714 Cell: 410-375-7342

About Mercy

Founded in 1874 in downtown Baltimore by the Sisters of Mercy, Mercy Medical Center is a 183-licensed bed acute care university-affiliated teaching hospital. Mercy has been recognized as a top Maryland hospital by U.S. News & World Report; a Top 100 hospital for Women’s Health & Orthopedics by Healthgrades; is currently A-rated for Hospital Safety (Leapfrog Group), and is recognized by the American Nurses Credentialing Center as a Magnet Hospital. Mercy Medical Center is part of Mercy Health Services (MHS), the parent of Mercy’s primary care and specialty care physician enterprise, known as Mercy Personal Physicians, which employs more than 200 providers with locations in Baltimore, Lutherville, Overlea, Glen Burnie, Columbia and Reisterstown. For more information about Mercy, visit www.mdmercy.com, MDMercyMedia on FacebookTwitter, or call 1-800-MD-Mercy.

News and Events