Mercy Neurosurgeon Dr. Charles Park Discusses Concussion in Women

January 5, 2017
Neurosurgery at Mercy - Baltimore, MD

There are potential long-term health consequences when concussions are serious.

Anyone can suffer a concussion, but studies have shown that women are more prone to them than men.

According to neurosurgeon Dr. Charles Park, Director of The Minimally Invasive Brain & Spine Center at Mercy, no one's exactly sure why women tend to have longer-lasting symptoms and take more time to recover from a concussion.

"There are a lot of theories as to why that happens; some are hormonal things. They go through hormone changes, and it effects the pituitary and products of progesterone, which is a healing hormone is the body, likely to get a concussion," Dr. Park said.

Concussions can't be spotted from the outside, nor can they be seen with imaging tools like MRIs or CT scans, which is why doctors rely on symptoms to diagnose them.

View Dr. Charles Park’s interview regarding women and concussion.


Dan Collins - Senior Director of Media Relations at Mercy Medical Center

Dan Collins, Senior Director of Media Relations

Email: dcollins@mdmercy.com Office: 410-332-9714 Cell: 410-375-7342

About Mercy

Founded in 1874 in downtown Baltimore by the Sisters of Mercy, Mercy Medical Center is a 183-licensed bed acute care university-affiliated teaching hospital. Mercy has been recognized as a top Maryland hospital by U.S. News & World Report; a Top 100 hospital for Women’s Health & Orthopedics by Healthgrades; is currently A-rated for Hospital Safety (Leapfrog Group), and is recognized by the American Nurses Credentialing Center as a Magnet Hospital. Mercy Medical Center is part of Mercy Health Services (MHS), the parent of Mercy’s primary care and specialty care physician enterprise, known as Mercy Personal Physicians, which employs more than 200 providers with locations in Baltimore, Lutherville, Overlea, Glen Burnie, Columbia and Reisterstown. For more information about Mercy, visit www.mdmercy.com, MDMercyMedia on FacebookTwitter, or call 1-800-MD-Mercy.

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