Mercy's Dr. Jessalynn Adam Discusses Knee Ligament Injuries in Women

October 8, 2018
Orthopedics and Joint Replacement at Mercy - Baltimore, MD

Women are twice as likely as men to tear their ACL.

Hillary Sorg has been active her whole life. She is currently working through a running injury to her foot, but a lifetime of playing sports has come with injuries.

Faint scars are visible on both her knees. They are small souvenirs from torn ACLs.

"Same injury, same were both noncontact. I just pivoted wrong and then twisted the wrong way and felt something pop," Sorg said.

That pop is often a sign of a ligament injury.

"You'll have a loud pop, or you'll feel a pop, and then you'll usually get fairly immediate swelling," said Jessalynn Adam, M.D., a fellowship-trained, board-certified physician specializing in Primary Care Sports Medicine with Orthopedics and Joint Replacement at Mercy Medical Center.

According to Dr. Adam, it is very common, especially in women, likely because anatomy and biomechanics.

"If you ever watch someone come down from a jump, say a basketball player, and you watch the direction that their knees go, if they tend to knock inward, that's been associated with a risk for ACL injury, and that movement pattern tends to be more common in women for a number of reasons," Dr. Adam said.

Some research suggests hormones play are a factor, too.

It’s important to remember it's possible to return to your normal life. Rehab is an option, and so is surgery.
Sorg made a choice she's happy with.

"I think I came back stronger than the first time," Sorg said.

View Mercy sports medicine expert Dr. Jessalynn Adam’s insights on knee ligament injuries like ACL.


Dan Collins - Senior Director of Media Relations at Mercy Medical Center

Dan Collins, Senior Director of Media Relations

Email: dcollins@mdmercy.com Office: 410-332-9714 Cell: 410-375-7342

About Mercy

Founded in 1874 in downtown Baltimore by the Sisters of Mercy, Mercy Medical Center is a 183-licensed bed acute care university-affiliated teaching hospital. Mercy has been recognized as a top Maryland hospital by U.S. News & World Report; a Top 100 hospital for Women’s Health & Orthopedics by Healthgrades; is currently A-rated for Hospital Safety (Leapfrog Group), and is recognized by the American Nurses Credentialing Center as a Magnet Hospital. Mercy Medical Center is part of Mercy Health Services (MHS), the parent of Mercy’s primary care and specialty care physician enterprise, known as Mercy Personal Physicians, which employs more than 200 providers with locations in Baltimore, Lutherville, Overlea, Glen Burnie, Columbia and Reisterstown. For more information about Mercy, visit www.mdmercy.com, MDMercyMedia on FacebookTwitter, or call 1-800-MD-Mercy.

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